law

#396      36 min 57 sec
Rivers as persons: What it means to give legal rights to nature

Erin O'Donnell
Julia Talbot-Jones

Environmental law researcher Erin O'Donnell and economist Julia Talbot-Jones explain what's behind recent moves to give legal personhood to rivers in India, New Zealand and elsewhere. With philosophical roots going back decades, new legal and legislative developments granting personhood to nature seek both to recognise indigenous or religious claims as well as provide new avenues for environmental protection. But what does this mean, and how will giving rights to nature be enforced? Can rivers now bring lawsuits, and can we, in turn, sue them? Presented by Lynne Haultain.

#383      33 min 54 sec
Crimes of state: When a nation goes from protector to perpetrator

Prof Penny Green

Criminologist Penny Green explains how states, entrusted to define crimes and enforce the laws that deter them, can themselves be complicit in the worst social harms. Professor Green is director of the International State Crime Initiative, which seeks to understand how states can become perpetrators rather than protectors, and how civil society groups can be enlisted to fight back. Presented by Lynne Haultain.

#379      30 min 17 sec
Old and in the way? Aging workers and generational battle lines in the workplace

Prof Mia Rönnmar

As populations in the developed economies continue to age due to longer life expectancies and lower birth rates, what will be the impact on the workplace? Is there a place for positive age discrimination at a time of high youth unemployment, or should the rights of all workers -- regardless of their years -- be respected? And to what extent do economics, culture and individual aspiration play into how societies decide how long one can or should work?

Industrial relations and elder law expert Professor Mia Rönnmar, from Lund University, joins host Lynne Haultain for an international perspective on the place and plight of older workers in the workforce.

#376      52 min 43 sec
Jihad and 'just war': Twisting the law on the way to the battlefield

Prof Naz Modirzadeh
Assoc Prof Andrew March

International law expert Prof Naz Modirzadeh and political scientist Assoc Prof Andrew March explore how the United States and other governments contort and stretch international and domestic laws to accommodate the waging of war on non-state Islamist forces, and how those forces themselves invoke Islamic law to justify their actions. Presented by Lynne Haultain.

#372      41 min 22 sec
The road to dignity: Philip Alston on freedom from poverty as a human right

Prof Philip Alston

Is extreme poverty merely evidence of failed economic policy or should it also be seen as a breach of human rights? Legal scholar and UN Special Rapporteur Philip Alston argues that the conversation around human rights has yet to take seriously how the world's very poor are excluded from a life of dignity -- underpinned by access to education, basic health care and housing -- while extreme inequality is itself in part sustained by the blocking of civil and political rights by elites. Presented by Peter Mares.

#370      30 min 53 sec
Twin engines of truth? How science and law interact to construct our world

Prof Sheila Jasanoff

Social science and legal scholar Prof Sheila Jasanoff discusses how science and the law interact or compete with one another in the formulation of public reason -- in the economy, the courts and the political landscape. Presented by Lynne Haultain.

#359      39 min 28 sec
Melody and mayhem: Music, law and the incitement to violence

Dr James Parker

Legal scholar Dr James Parker discusses the complex intersection of sound and the law -- from musical incitement to violence, to sonic crowd control, to the very deliberate design of courtroom acoustics. Presented by Peter Clarke.

#353      32 min 09 sec
From Proletariat to Precariat: Navigating Uncertainty in a Globalised Economy

Prof Leon Fink

American labor historian Leon Fink discusses the rise of the Precariat -- people in developed economies in a permanent state of underemployment or intermittent work due to changes in working conditions since the 19th century. Presented by Elisabeth Lopez.

#350      35 min 51 sec
Superdiversity: Policy challenges in an age of unprecedented migration

Prof Jenny Phillimore

Migration researcher Prof Jenny Phillimore explains how the recent global phenomenon of superdiversity is challenging policy makers and service providers to rethink housing and health care in our cities and beyond. Presented by Lynne Haultain.

#343      29 min 55 sec
Cannabis research: The state of the science in an age of weed liberalization

Prof David Castle

Psychiatrist and clinical researcher Prof David Castle discusses how cannabis represents both a public health risk and a wide-ranging therapeutic opportunity, as the once “evil weed” gains greater legal acceptance for recreational and medical use. Presented by Eric van Bemmel.