public policy

#346      31 min 24 sec
Superstar firms in the global economy: Towards a new understanding of international markets

Prof Peter Neary

Oxford economist Prof Peter Neary talks about new research into international trading firms that reveals some uncomfortable truths for policy makers and governments hoping to pick export winners and encourage startups. Presented by Elisabeth Lopez.

#343      29 min 55 sec
Cannabis research: The state of the science in an age of weed liberalization

Prof David Castle

Psychiatrist and clinical researcher Prof David Castle discusses how cannabis represents both a public health risk and a wide-ranging therapeutic opportunity, as the once “evil weed” gains greater legal acceptance for recreational and medical use. Presented by Eric van Bemmel.

#341      27 min 00 sec
Fume with a view: Consumer products and your indoor air quality

Prof Anne Steinemann

Civil and environmental engineer Prof Anne Steinemann outlines the causes and consequences of poor indoor air quality, and in particular the potentially hazardous fumes generated by home cleaning and personal care products. Presented by Dr Andi Horvath.

#339      32 min 38 sec
Machine politics: Electronic voting and the persistent doubts about its integrity

Dr J Alex Halderman
Dr Vanessa Teague

Alex Halderman and Vanessa Teague, security experts in electronic and internet voting, argue that despite the speed and efficiency promises of e-balloting, it has yet to convincingly deliver the privacy, reliability and vote integrity that the democratic process requires and that voters expect. Presented by Elisabeth Lopez.

#338      41 min 04 sec
Man about town: Neil Brenner on reframing our cities and their global impact

Prof Neil Brenner

Renowned urban theorist Neil Brenner argues that the widespread notion we live in an “urban age” as people move increasingly into cities is fundamentally flawed. He also suggests that “urbanization” be redefined to include the profound impact of city growth on ever more distant hinterlands. Presented by Peter Mares.

#333      33 min 04 sec
Whatever happened to the ozone hole? Lessons in timely action to avert global disaster

Prof David Karoly
Dr Robyn Schofield

Atmospheric scientists Prof David Karoly and Dr Robyn Schofield discuss the hole in the ozone layer over the Antarctic, and what effect timely global action taken in 1987 seems to have had in reversing ozone degradation. Presented by Dr Shane Huntington.

#331      35 min 06 sec
Contagion calculation: Forecasting and tracking outbreaks of influenza

Assoc Prof Jodie McVernon

Epidemiologist Assoc Prof Jodie McVernon discusses research into tracking and predicting the spread of influenza and other viral diseases like Ebola. Presented by Dr Shane Huntington.

#330      
Margaret Wertheim: Confessions of a science communicator

Margaret Wertheim

Celebrated science writer and author Margaret Wertheim discusses the state of science journalism and communication in a world of fragmented social and digital media, as well as her craft-based efforts to foster scientific and mathematical awareness. With Dr Shane Huntington.

#321      32 min 57 sec
Accounting for the rest of us: Capturing important truths about business organizations

Sir David Tweedie

Accounting standard setter and reformer Sir David Tweedie discusses the importance to national economies of global standards of corporate reporting and valuation. He also explains the challenges to having such common standards adopted by individual nation states. Presented by Eric van Bemmel.

#320      30 min 17 sec
Stethoscopes to spreadsheets: The rise of the physician-executive

Assoc Prof Helen Dickinson

Public governance and health care reform researcher Assoc Prof Helen Dickinson describes the benefits of getting doctors into positions of leadership in medical organisations and national health care systems. Challenges include luring candidates from the clinic to the executive suite, and providing training to doctors in managerial methods. Presented by Eric van Bemmel.