species

#371      33 min 01 sec
Slippery descent: Untangling the complexity of our evolutionary history

Prof Bernard Wood

Renowned paleoanthropologist Bernard Wood explains how continuing research into fossil and other evidence of our evolutionary history produces insights but also reveals how much we have yet to learn. How good, for example, are we at telling our recent ancestors and close relatives from those of the apes? How can we know how many species preceded our own? And can we tell which of those species are our ancestors, and which are non-ancestral close relatives? Presented by Dr Andi Horvath.

#364      32 min 09 sec
The end of sustainability: Realism and resilience in managing our natural resources

Prof Robin Craig

Environmental legal scholar Prof. Robin Craig argues that the doctrine of sustainability in managing our natural resources fails to take into account an emerging age of ecological uncertainty. Instead, notions of sustainability and sustainable development need to make way for approaches based on resilience thinking, which attempts to factor in and adapt to coming large-scale social and ecological shifts brought about by climate change. Presented by Eric van Bemmel.

#355      35 min 43 sec
Hello, Pet!: Our love can hurt our animal friends

Prof Peter Sandøe

Bioethicist Peter Sandøe discusses our complicated relationship with animals and associated moral dilemmas, including how our love for companion animals can actually cause harm and the difference between society’s treatment of pets and production animals. Presented by Peter Clarke.

#351      33 min 31 sec
Weeds girdle the globe: The marauding march of invasive plant species

Prof Roger Cousens

Plant population specialist Prof Roger Cousens talks about how the spread of undesirable plants, or "weeds", has dramatically redefined the world’s natural landscapes and coastlines, and what this means for us economically, aesthetically and environmentally. Presented by Dr Andi Horvath.

#316      34 min 37 sec
Natural value: Pricing ecosystems, and its implications for conservation policy

Assoc. Prof. Brendan Wintle

Conservation ecologist Assoc. Prof. Brendan Wintle considers the difficult questions and dilemmas that arise in decisions around species and ecosystem conservation, and whether a monetary value can or should be applied to nature. Presented by Dr Dyani Lewis.

#292      25 min 36 sec
Prey for the oceans: How marine predators influence reef ecology

Prof Robert Warner

Marine biologist, Prof Robert Warner, discusses the relationship between marine predators and their prey. He also explains why marine environments may be more robust than terrestrial ecosystems in the face of human impacts. Presented by Dr Dyani Lewis.

#254      33 min 22 sec
Vanquishing the vectors: Enlisting bacteria to fight mosquito-borne disease

Prof Ary Hoffmann

Geneticist Professor Ary Hoffmann explains the use of mosquito-infecting bacteria for the control of Dengue fever. Presented by Dr Dyani Lewis.

#250      31 min 10 sec
Komodo to our place: In the field with the giant monitor lizard

Dr Tim Jessop


Integrative ecologist Dr Tim Jessop talks about the fascinating biology and the ecology of the Komodo dragon -- the largest lizard in the world. Presented by Dr Shane Huntington.

#209      32 min 45 sec
Ageing's all the rage: The science behind growing old

Prof. Dame Linda Partridge

In a wide ranging discussion on ageing, Professor Dame Linda Partridge delves into the research findings on longevity in humans and animals, and ponders evolutionary perspectives on the ageing process. Presented by Dr Shane Huntington.

#199      25 min 11 sec
Catching evolution in the act: Bird color and the making of new species

Dr Devi Stuart-Fox

Evolutionary biologist Dr Devi Stuart-Fox explains how bird species in which plumage color form varies from member to member evolve into new species at a faster rate than species of a uniform plumage color form -- confirming a half century-old evolutionary theory. Presented by Dr Shane Huntington.