climate

#406      30 min 12 sec
Treaty fatigue: International law meets the new globalized nationalism

Judge James Crawford

International Court of Justice jurist James Crawford on the diminishing appetite of nation states to join new international agreements or remain in established ones, with troubling implications for formulating and upholding international laws. Presented by Lynne Haultain.

#397      29 min 10 sec
Embracing the finite: Making our way in an era of dwindling natural resources

Prof. Peter Vitousek

Ecologist Prof. Peter Vitousek explores how living in the Anthropocene, a time in which human activity has become the key driver of planetary health, will force us to make our way with diminished natural resources. Peter also asks what we can learn from the historical experience of Pacific Islanders, whose cultural and agricultural practices were shaped by a profound understanding that their immediate horizons were in fact the very limits of their worlds. Presented by Dr Andi Horvath.

#386      36 min 43 sec
Global warming's companion crisis: Reactive nitrogen and its threat to human and planetary health

Prof Mark Sutton

Environmental physicist Prof Mark Sutton explains how our fast growing "nitrogen footprint" from agriculture and industry is reaching crisis levels as reactive nitrogen pollutes our air and soil and is a direct threat to human health. A leading researcher and advisor on nitrogen policy, Prof Sutton argues that smarter nitrogen management is not only a health and environmental priority but will prevent continued enormous economic losses. Presented by Dr Andi Horvath.

#385      30 min 34 sec
Outbreak! Human pandemics and how to manage the inevitable

Prof Eddie Holmes

Virologist Eddie Holmes explains how viral and bacterial pandemics of the type that spawned the Black Death and Ebola remain an unpredictable and inevitable part of our future. Professor Holmes describes how new technologies like genomic sequencing help us explore the origins and evolution of pathogens linked to pandemics as far back as Ancient Rome, and how evolving biosecurity and surveillance systems offer us a chance of containing outbreaks. Presented by Dr Andi Horvath.

#382      33 min 27 sec
Going viral: Global food security under threat from crop and livestock diseases

Prof John Fazakerley

Virologist and infectious diseases expert Prof John Fazakerley details the myriad threats to the global food supply from pathogen infestations in crops and livestock, and how new genetic and surveillance technologies are lending hope to keeping them in check. Presented by Dr Andi Horvath.

#365      31 min 31 sec
Managing transition: How do we prepare for complex social and environmental change?

Prof Jan Rotmans

Transition management thinker Prof Jan Rotmans argues that there must be a radical shakeup of existing institutions and governing structures if we are to deal with the shared, complex challenges emerging in social, economic, energy and environmental realms. Presented by Elisabeth Lopez.

#364      32 min 09 sec
The end of sustainability: Realism and resilience in managing our natural resources

Prof Robin Craig

Environmental legal scholar Prof. Robin Craig argues that the doctrine of sustainability in managing our natural resources fails to take into account an emerging age of ecological uncertainty. Instead, notions of sustainability and sustainable development need to make way for approaches based on resilience thinking, which attempts to factor in and adapt to coming large-scale social and ecological shifts brought about by climate change. Presented by Eric van Bemmel.

#333      33 min 04 sec
Whatever happened to the ozone hole? Lessons in timely action to avert global disaster

Prof David Karoly
Dr Robyn Schofield

Atmospheric scientists Prof David Karoly and Dr Robyn Schofield discuss the hole in the ozone layer over the Antarctic, and what effect timely global action taken in 1987 seems to have had in reversing ozone degradation. Presented by Dr Shane Huntington.

#330      
Margaret Wertheim: Confessions of a science communicator

Margaret Wertheim

Celebrated science writer and author Margaret Wertheim discusses the state of science journalism and communication in a world of fragmented social and digital media, as well as her craft-based efforts to foster scientific and mathematical awareness. With Dr Shane Huntington.

#316      34 min 37 sec
Natural value: Pricing ecosystems, and its implications for conservation policy

Assoc. Prof. Brendan Wintle

Conservation ecologist Assoc. Prof. Brendan Wintle considers the difficult questions and dilemmas that arise in decisions around species and ecosystem conservation, and whether a monetary value can or should be applied to nature. Presented by Dr Dyani Lewis.