economics

#400      43 min 23 sec
Phantom democracies: John Keane on the New Global Despotism

Prof. John Keane

Political scientist and author John Keane on the recent proliferation of corrupt political regimes that employ democratic rhetoric, staged elections, social media and economic growth to cultivate public loyalty and give the appearance of legitimacy. Presented by Peter Mares.

#399      28 min 10 sec
How attitudes disable: Rethinking our assumptions about people with impairments

Professor Eric Emerson

Social epidemiologist Prof. Eric Emerson argues that "disability" and "being disabled" really refer to the effects of social and economic marginalisation of people with certain types of physical or mental impairments, and not the personal impact of the impairments themselves. While some societies have made strides in improving the lives of the people with impairments, we have yet to tackle our fundamental assumptions about disability and how it arises from the interaction between health conditions and the society in which we live. Presented by Lynne Haultain.

#395      35 min 05 sec
China in Africa: Who benefits?

Dr Lauren Johnston

Economist Dr Lauren Johnston examines the evolving political and economic relationships between China and Africa, and how the East Asia giant is adapting its own model of aid, trade and investment to grow regional African markets and economies while securing a rising supply of energy and mineral resources for itself. Presented by Peter Clarke.

#382      33 min 27 sec
Going viral: Global food security under threat from crop and livestock diseases

Prof John Fazakerley

Virologist and infectious diseases expert Prof John Fazakerley details the myriad threats to the global food supply from pathogen infestations in crops and livestock, and how new genetic and surveillance technologies are lending hope to keeping them in check. Presented by Dr Andi Horvath.

#379      30 min 17 sec
Old and in the way? Aging workers and generational battle lines in the workplace

Prof Mia Rönnmar

As populations in the developed economies continue to age due to longer life expectancies and lower birth rates, what will be the impact on the workplace? Is there a place for positive age discrimination at a time of high youth unemployment, or should the rights of all workers -- regardless of their years -- be respected? And to what extent do economics, culture and individual aspiration play into how societies decide how long one can or should work?

Industrial relations and elder law expert Professor Mia Rönnmar, from Lund University, joins host Lynne Haultain for an international perspective on the place and plight of older workers in the workforce.

#372      41 min 22 sec
The road to dignity: Philip Alston on freedom from poverty as a human right

Prof Philip Alston

Is extreme poverty merely evidence of failed economic policy or should it also be seen as a breach of human rights? Legal scholar and UN Special Rapporteur Philip Alston argues that the conversation around human rights has yet to take seriously how the world's very poor are excluded from a life of dignity -- underpinned by access to education, basic health care and housing -- while extreme inequality is itself in part sustained by the blocking of civil and political rights by elites. Presented by Peter Mares.

#368      31 min 43 sec
Decision neuroscience: Emerging insights into the way we choose

Prof Peter Bossaerts

Decision science researcher Prof Peter Bossaerts argues that investigating brain activity as we make decisions is generating new insights into how we deal with uncertainty and risk. Once the domain of economists and psychologists, the study of human decision-making is increasingly taking a neuron-level view, with implications well beyond economics and finance. Presented by Eric van Bemmel.

#362      32 min 27 sec
Costing us dearly: The toll of austerity policy on public health

Prof David Stuckler

Oxford sociologist and political economist Prof. David Stuckler argues that austerity policies imposed by national governments in response to economic crises bring about increases in disturbing public health outcomes -- particularly among those societies' most vulnerable people -- while countries that opt for stimulus-based policies have demonstrably healthier outcomes. Presented by Eric van Bemmel.

#356      37 min 36 sec
Digital "dischord": How technology and markets are bleeding our musical artists

Prof Andrew Leyshon

Economic geographer Prof Andrew Leyshon charts the rapid changes in the music industry since the 1990s, how new technologies are changing how music is made and consumed, and how artists are affected. Presented by Peter Clarke.

#353      32 min 09 sec
From Proletariat to Precariat: Navigating Uncertainty in a Globalised Economy

Prof Leon Fink

American labor historian Leon Fink discusses the rise of the Precariat -- people in developed economies in a permanent state of underemployment or intermittent work due to changes in working conditions since the 19th century. Presented by Elisabeth Lopez.