geography

#405      40 min 57 sec
What are the keys to a successful urban innovation district?

Julie Wagner

Urban thinker Julie Wagner describes how so-called innovation districts in cities around the world evolve or are planned, and how their reliance on the physical and the local — in even the most high tech of industries — serves to foster creativity and collaboration. Presented by Eric van Bemmel.

#403      39 min 55 sec
Copping it globally: The rise and reach of transnational policing

Prof Ben Bowling

Criminologist Ben Bowling on how policing is increasingly crossing national borders, chasing globalized crime and cyber offenses, and raising serious questions about governance and public accountability. Ben also examines issues around stop-and-search police powers in the global context. Presented by Peter Clarke.

#397      29 min 10 sec
Embracing the finite: Making our way in an era of dwindling natural resources

Prof. Peter Vitousek

Ecologist Prof. Peter Vitousek explores how living in the Anthropocene, a time in which human activity has become the key driver of planetary health, will force us to make our way with diminished natural resources. Peter also asks what we can learn from the historical experience of Pacific Islanders, whose cultural and agricultural practices were shaped by a profound understanding that their immediate horizons were in fact the very limits of their worlds. Presented by Dr Andi Horvath.

#388      34 min 12 sec
The power of a warm welcome: Forging a humanitarian response to refugees amid negative media imagery

Prof Uma Kothari

Are refugees fleeing persecution today generally seen as people who need help, or problems to be pushed away? Migration and refugee researcher Prof. Uma Kothari discusses how media representations of asylum seekers influence us in how we attend and respond to the plight of individuals and groups fleeing their countries in search of safety. Presented by Peter Mares.

#381      28 min 36 sec
Let's get physical: Designing cities with our health in mind

Prof Mark Stevenson

Urban public health researcher Prof Mark Stevenson describes the better human health outcomes to be had in cities that emphasize active transport modes like cycling and walking, while discouraging dependence on cars. Presented by Lynne Haultain.

#375      30 min 55 sec
Ear to the ground: Preparing for and recovering from earthquakes

Assoc Prof Mark Quigley

Earthquake researcher Assoc Prof Mark Quigley explains the lessons learned from recent major earthquakes into how to better prepare regions at risk, the value of strong science communication to affected populations during crisis, and the importance of developing appropriate building codes in anticipation of the Next Big One. Presented by Dr Andi Horvath.

#356      37 min 36 sec
Digital "dischord": How technology and markets are bleeding our musical artists

Prof Andrew Leyshon

Economic geographer Prof Andrew Leyshon charts the rapid changes in the music industry since the 1990s, how new technologies are changing how music is made and consumed, and how artists are affected. Presented by Peter Clarke.

#351      33 min 31 sec
Weeds girdle the globe: The marauding march of invasive plant species

Prof Roger Cousens

Plant population specialist Prof Roger Cousens talks about how the spread of undesirable plants, or "weeds", has dramatically redefined the world’s natural landscapes and coastlines, and what this means for us economically, aesthetically and environmentally. Presented by Dr Andi Horvath.

#350      35 min 51 sec
Superdiversity: Policy challenges in an age of unprecedented migration

Prof Jenny Phillimore

Migration researcher Prof Jenny Phillimore explains how the recent global phenomenon of superdiversity is challenging policy makers and service providers to rethink housing and health care in our cities and beyond. Presented by Lynne Haultain.

#338      41 min 04 sec
Man about town: Neil Brenner on reframing our cities and their global impact

Prof Neil Brenner

Renowned urban theorist Neil Brenner argues that the widespread notion we live in an “urban age” as people move increasingly into cities is fundamentally flawed. He also suggests that “urbanization” be redefined to include the profound impact of city growth on ever more distant hinterlands. Presented by Peter Mares.