law

REBROADCAST #343      29 min 55 sec
Cannabis research: The state of the science in an age of weed liberalization

Prof David Castle

Psychiatrist and clinical researcher Prof David Castle discusses how cannabis represents both a public health risk and a wide-ranging therapeutic opportunity, as the once “evil weed” gains greater legal acceptance for recreational and medical use. Presented by Eric van Bemmel.

REBROADCAST #342      30 min 32 sec
Dynamics of scandal: On facilitating, denying and covering up institutional child sex abuse

Prof Chris Greer

In this rebroadcast episode, sociologist Prof Chris Greer explores the often murky agendas of organisations, mainstream and social media, and individuals in the facilitation, denial and cover-up of institutional child sex abuse. Presented by Lynne Haultain.

#406      30 min 12 sec
Treaty fatigue: International law meets the new globalized nationalism

Judge James Crawford

International Court of Justice jurist James Crawford on the diminishing appetite of nation states to join new international agreements or remain in established ones, with troubling implications for formulating and upholding international laws. Presented by Lynne Haultain.

#403      39 min 55 sec
Copping it globally: The rise and reach of transnational policing

Prof Ben Bowling

Criminologist Ben Bowling on how policing is increasingly crossing national borders, chasing globalized crime and cyber offenses, and raising serious questions about governance and public accountability. Ben also examines issues around stop-and-search police powers in the global context. Presented by Peter Clarke.

#396      36 min 57 sec
Rivers as persons: What it means to give legal rights to nature

Erin O'Donnell
Julia Talbot-Jones

Environmental law researcher Erin O'Donnell and economist Julia Talbot-Jones explain what's behind recent moves to give legal personhood to rivers in India, New Zealand and elsewhere. With philosophical roots going back decades, new legal and legislative developments granting personhood to nature seek both to recognise indigenous or religious claims as well as provide new avenues for environmental protection. But what does this mean, and how will giving rights to nature be enforced? Can rivers now bring lawsuits, and can we, in turn, sue them? Presented by Lynne Haultain.

#383      33 min 54 sec
Crimes of state: When a nation goes from protector to perpetrator

Prof Penny Green

Criminologist Penny Green explains how states, entrusted to define crimes and enforce the laws that deter them, can themselves be complicit in the worst social harms. Professor Green is director of the International State Crime Initiative, which seeks to understand how states can become perpetrators rather than protectors, and how civil society groups can be enlisted to fight back. Presented by Lynne Haultain.

#379      30 min 17 sec
Old and in the way? Aging workers and generational battle lines in the workplace

Prof Mia Rönnmar

As populations in the developed economies continue to age due to longer life expectancies and lower birth rates, what will be the impact on the workplace? Is there a place for positive age discrimination at a time of high youth unemployment, or should the rights of all workers -- regardless of their years -- be respected? And to what extent do economics, culture and individual aspiration play into how societies decide how long one can or should work?

Industrial relations and elder law expert Professor Mia Rönnmar, from Lund University, joins host Lynne Haultain for an international perspective on the place and plight of older workers in the workforce.

#376      52 min 43 sec
Jihad and 'just war': Twisting the law on the way to the battlefield

Prof Naz Modirzadeh
Assoc Prof Andrew March

International law expert Prof Naz Modirzadeh and political scientist Assoc Prof Andrew March explore how the United States and other governments contort and stretch international and domestic laws to accommodate the waging of war on non-state Islamist forces, and how those forces themselves invoke Islamic law to justify their actions. Presented by Lynne Haultain.

#372      41 min 22 sec
The road to dignity: Philip Alston on freedom from poverty as a human right

Prof Philip Alston

Is extreme poverty merely evidence of failed economic policy or should it also be seen as a breach of human rights? Legal scholar and UN Special Rapporteur Philip Alston argues that the conversation around human rights has yet to take seriously how the world's very poor are excluded from a life of dignity -- underpinned by access to education, basic health care and housing -- while extreme inequality is itself in part sustained by the blocking of civil and political rights by elites. Presented by Peter Mares.

#370      30 min 53 sec
Twin engines of truth? How science and law interact to construct our world

Prof Sheila Jasanoff

Social science and legal scholar Prof Sheila Jasanoff discusses how science and the law interact or compete with one another in the formulation of public reason -- in the economy, the courts and the political landscape. Presented by Lynne Haultain.